Green Tea

Used In: Classic - Immune - Focus - Cheia Vida


Green, Oolong, and Black Tea all come from the leaf of the camellia sinensis plant. It is the processes after the leaves are harvested that differentiates between the teas. Green Tea leaves are lightly steamed and retain the most nutrients. The Chinese have been using Green Tea for its medicinal benefits for at least 4,000 years and it is still recognized as an elixir for good health.

Compounds in Green Tea:
Green Tea contains polyphenols, phytochemicals, amino acids (L-Theanine), chlorophyll, carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbic acid, minerals, and trace elements. The polyphenols, a large group of plant chemicals that includes the catechins, are thought to be responsible for the health benefits that have traditionally been attributed to tea, especially Green Tea.

The most active and abundant catechin in Green Tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Milligram for milligram, EGCG has 25 to 100 times the antioxidant power of vitamins C and E. EGCG kills cancer cells without harming healthy tissue.

EGCG has also been effective in lowering LDL cholesterol levels (Green Tea has been shown to be as potent as Lipitor, Zocor, or Crestin with none of their side effects), lowering serum triglyceride levels, and inhibiting the abnormal formation of blood clots. The latter takes on added importance when you consider that thrombosis (the formation of abnormal blood clots) is the leading cause of heart attacks and stroke.

EGCG has also been shown to protect brain cells and may help minimize the brain damage that occurs after a stroke. In one study, researchers concluded that Green Tea catechins efficiently protect the brain from irreversible damage due to cerebral ischemia and consequent neurologic deficits.

According to a survey released by the United States Department of Agriculture in 2007, the mean content of flavonoids in a cup of Green Tea is higher than that in the same volume of other food and drink items that are traditionally considered to be of a health contributing nature, including fresh fruits, vegetable juices, or wine. Flavonoids are a group of phytochemicals in most plant products that are responsible for such health effects as anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic functions.

Benefits of Green Tea:
Green Tea drinkers appear to have a lower risk of a wide range of diseases, from simple bacterial or viral infections to chronic degenerative conditions including cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke, periodontal disease, and osteoporosis (greater bone marrow density). Green Tea may also help reduce the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes by inhibiting amylase, an enzyme that breaks down starch into sugar, while improving insulin secretion.

Additionally Green Tea has been shown to enhance immunity in our bodies, help prevent aging, prevent cholesterol absorption in the digestive tract, be an effective flu treatment, augment fat oxidation, improve artery function, help prevent tooth decay (kill the bacteria that causes dental plaque), reverse DNA damage, aid memory and cognitive functions, and act as a metabolic stimulant.