Cinnamon

Used In: Classic - Immune - Focus - Chiea Vida


Cinnamon has been used for thousands of years as a spice and medicine. It’s mentioned in the Bible as an ingredient in the oils used to anoint Moses, and also as a token of friendship. Mourners burned cinnamon on funeral pyres in ancient Rome in order to cover up the smell of burning flesh.

In ancient Egypt, cinnamon was used as a medicine and an embalming agent, and at times it was even considered more precious than gold. It was also popular in China, and is mentioned in one of the earliest books on Chinese botanical medicine.

Today cinnamon is widely used in ayurvedic medicine (traditional Indian medicine) to treat diabetes in India. And recently Richard Anderson and his team at the US Department of Agriculture’s Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, discovered the scientific evidence that demonstrates how cinnamon serves as an important antioxidant, and is beneficial in the prevention and control of glucose intolerance and diabetes.

Cinnamon contains a water-soluble polyphenol compound called MHCP (methylhydroxy chalcone polymer), which is partly responsible for its health benefits. In unpublished test tube experiments, researchers found that MHCP mimics insulin, activates its receptor, and works synergistically with insulin in cells.